lakhpat-300x186(1) Lakhpat
At the far northwest corner of Kutch, facing north across the Great Rann towards Pakistan, stands Lakhpat, once an important port city but now virtually abandoned for almost 200 years. A place where you can imagine the rise and decline of a great port city, and simultaneously contemplate the vast emptiness of the desert and the sea.

When the 1819 earthquake sent the Indus River on its present course to the west and the Great Rann dried up, so did Lakhpat. It was left a humble town around the ruins of its former grandness, now only with Kori Creek that still flows into the Rann . Though it requires a long journey to reach Lakhpat, the intrepid traveler will be rewarded. The 7 km fort walls, erected in 1801 by Jamadar Fateh Muhammed, are still nearly intact, and offer tremendous views out over the Rann. Due to the extremely clear desert air and remote location, the night sky is spectacular (visit near the new moon for best stargazing) and sunrise or sunset in a landscape of such endless horizons are not to be missed.

Lakhpat has religious significance for three of India’s most populous religions: Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, reportedly camped here on his journey to Mecca. The site later became a gurudwara, which holds some of Nanak’s possessions; Pir Ghaus Muhammed, a Sufi mystic who from the age of twelve devoted himself to spiritual practice and reportedly practiced half as a Hindu and half as a Muslim, is buried here in Lakhpat. His tomb is a stone construction with very complex carvings and a water tank that is said to have healing properties for skin problems; Sayyed Pir Shah’s nine-domed mausoleum has intricate carvings, doors, windows and jaalis.

Lakhpat has very few services for visitors; you can buy tea, coffee, and a basic lunch, but do not count on being able to find any other supplies. The only accommodation is in the gurudwara, which is meant more for religious pilgrims than general tourists. Lodging is in the gurudwara dormitory; there are no private bedrooms or bathrooms. For most visitors, spending the night in Narayan Sarovar is recommended, unless you are returning to Bhuj.

Kanthkot-300x168(2) Kanthkot
Kanthkot is an old fort about 5 km circularly situated on the top of an isolated rocky hill. This place was the capital of Kathis in 8th century and it was taken from them by the Chavdas. After the Chavdas, the Solanki’s came and after them the Vaghelas. Mod befriended Vaghela who not only gave Kanthkot but also his daughter in marriage to Mod’s son Sad. Sad lived in Kanthkot and made it his capital. Sad’s son Ful named the fort Kanthadurg. Bhimdev sought shelter from Mahmud of Ghazni in 11th century at Kanthkot. In 1816 it surrendered to the British who razed it to the ground. On the hill are remains of three temples of which one is dedicated to the ascetic Kanthadnath, the second a Jain temple and the third a temple of the sun.

roha-fort-300x225(3) Roha
Roha fort is situated on the hillock of the same name, 50 km from Bhuj. It’s height is 500 feet from the ground level and 800 feet from the sea level. Roha was the leading Jagir of Kutch state and there were 52 villages under this Jagir. Rao Khengarji I (1510-1585) established Kutch and became a ruler of Kutch. His brother Sahebji set up Roha village and died after a battle with Raysinhji Zala of Halvad. After his death his successor Jiyaji built two big tanks on the Roha Hill. His son built a fort on Roha hill. Thakore Kalapi was famous poet in Gujrat. He wrote romantic poems at Roha hill because atmosphere of Roha was peaceful and close to the nature with many peacocks and other birds which can be seen here even now. Roha is called Sumari Roha after the princesses of the Sumara state Umarkot. Fleeing Allaudin Khilji the princesses sought asylum with Abda, who died fighting Allaudin. Consequently the princesses took Samadhi at Roha. The present Thakore of Roha, Thakore Virensinhji Saheb lives in Bhuj and would like to develop the Roha hill as a tourist point. Tera lies 85 km west of the town of Bhuj. Tera castle on the western edge of the state of Gujrat dominates the plains of Kutch from its position on the banks of Tretara (Three lakes) namely Chattasar, Sumerasar and Chatasar.

tera-fort-300x199(4) Tera
Jagir consisted of 41 villages and was one of the largest Jagirs of Kutch state. There are Ramayan wall paintings in the Tera castle. There are elaborate carved and beautiful paintings on glass in the Jain temple. Bandhani (tie & dye), Block printing, mirror work, Jats embroidery are the main crafts of this town. There are many of wild life animals chinkara, Blue Bull, Wild Boar, Hyena, The Great Indian Bustard, Peacock, Black partridge, etc. A very famous Mahadev temple Pinglaswar is 35 km far from Tera.

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